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Table 5 Demographic characteristics of subjects with and without change in MSSA colonization, number (%) of subjects (N = 58) c

From: Antimicrobial resistance acquisition after international travel in U.S. travelers

  No change in MSSA (n = 49) Change in MSSA (n = 9)
Male gender 18 (37) 6 (67)
Age, median (minimum-maximum) 64 (15–82) 55 (18–81)
Regiona
 Mexico, Caribbean, & Central America 16 (33) 2 (22)
 Asia 14 (29) 3 (33)
 Africa 14 (29) 2 (22)
 Europe 4 (8) 1 (11)
 South America 1 (2) 1 (11)
 North America 2 (4) 0
Purpose of travela
 Vacation 37 (76) 6 (67)
 Visiting friends and relatives 7 (14) 3 (33)
 Other (missionary/volunteer) 5 (10) 0
 Deployment and military duty 3 (6) 1 (11)
 School 1 (2) 0
Duration of travel, median (minimum-maximum) 12 (6–105) 12 (8–42)
Living conditionsa
 Hotel 31 (63) 5 (56)
 Friends and relatives 10 (20) 3 (33)
 Group livingb 10 (20) 0
 Boat/cruise 6 (12) 1 (11)
Local water ingestion during travel 24 (49) 3 (33)
Water exposures during travel 18 (37) 2 (22)
Antibiotic exposure since enrollment 18 (37) 5 (56)
 Malaria chemoprophylaxis 17 (35) 5 (56)
  Atovaquone/Proguanil 15 (31) 2 (22)
  Doxycycline 1 (2) 2 (22)
  Chloroquine 1 (2) 1 (11)
 Antibiotics for traveler’s diarrhea since enrollment 3 (6) 0
  Ciprofloxacin 2 (4) 0
  Erythromycin 1 (2) 0
 Systemic antibiotics for other indications since enrollment 3 (6) 0
  Azithromycin 1 (2) 0
  Cephalexin 1 (2) 0
  Unknown antibiotic 1 (2) 0
Illness since enrollment 13 (27) 0
Duration of illness, median (minimum-maximum) 4 (1–27) n/a
  1. aPercentages greater than 100 as someone can be counted more than once based upon region of travel or living conditions
  2. bGroup living included barracks, dorms, or kibbutz
  3. cNo statistically significant differences identified between the two groups